Gaming Studio, Inc.

Authorizing Legislation

  Minnesota

 

In 2012, Minnesota authorized electronic simulated wheels.  That aimed to resolve issues with spin-bias caused by natural balance related anomalies, including variations in humidity in bars it also would solve the inadvertent and, possibly, intentional human spin bias ("pitching").  Additionally, the cost of using paper tickets with each and every wager, as required without this legislative fix, is so high that it is difficult for organizations to bear that electronic wheels become too expensive.  With an alternative method of wagering that is more efficient and less expensive, the electronic wheels will be part of the solution and the only table game in Minnesota Lawful Gambling (the most social of games allowed in the charitable gaming taverns) will have a market large enough to justify development costs.

HF 0356 and SF 0512

 

The bills for 2019, HF0356, authored by Representative Lien in the House and SF0512 by Senator Koran are identical to those of offered and not heard in 2018.  Salute Representative Lien and Senator Koran for their effort to finally complete the 2012 legislation by adding the regulatory and definitional context that is needed to realize what the legislators in 2012 intended.

 

These bills are among Allied Charities of Minnesota's priority legislation for 2019.


HF 0356 and SF 0512

 

The Bills are headed to the House Commerce Committee and in the Senate State Government Finance and Policy and Elections Committee

 

What They Do

 

Essentially these are technical bills in that every other game in Lawful Gambling or Charitable Gambling in Minnesota is offered in both paper and electronic editions.  This legislation would provide for the electronic editions of paddlewheels.

 

In Addition:

 

•  Reduces the amount of secured paper consumed (all of it imported into Minnesota) by allowing one ticket, printed on site, to contain all of a players selected wagers for each of up to ten consecutive spins, or in the case of a wheel used with a table, provides for the use of virtual tickets or chips for specific wagers - converted to a printed ticket for cashing out.  In both cases, the player must deliver a printed paper ticket to the cashier on site to collect winnings.

 

•  The value of very wager is recorded by computer, providing certain knowledge of gross wager per spin in real time.  This information is not known (for instance where every wager was placed) under the existing system.  Assurance that the wager was placed prior to the wheel being spun.

 

•  Alleviates the need to physically write payout amounts on each and every winning ticket.

 

•  Reduces the opening and closing work for organizations significantly.

 

•  All payouts are calculated by computer, reducing potential "human error."

 

•  Provides the Control Board with the explicit authority to scrutinize every element of electronic wheel games.  Currently there is no electronic wheel game review and regulatory processes.

 

•  Provides the use of symbols in addition to numerals on a wheel.  Symbols sometimes add a humorous element - like the very popular Pig Wheel™ in North Dakota.  So long as symbols are distinguishable, they should not be precluded.

 

•  Applies limits on bets and payouts to each wager made.

 

HF 0356 and SF 0512

What They Don't Do

 

•  Allow for player activated play.  Does not allow individual player terminals.

 

•  Does not allow for remote play.  You must be at the site and pay cash.

 

•  Does not increase the speed of the game play over the existing wheels.

 

•  Does not require change if organization wishes to continue the paper games.

 

•  Does not increase the bet limit over that currently allowed nor provide prizes above those allowed in Bingo, Pulltabs and Raffles.

Minnesota Electronic Wheel Ticket Bill

 

In 2012, Minnesota authorized electronic simulated wheels.  That aimed to resolve issues with spin-bias caused by natural balance related anomalies, including variations in humidity in bars it also would solve the inadvertent and, possibly, intentional human spin bias ("pitching").  However, the cost of use of a paper ticket with each and every wager is so high that the organizations could not bear the additional cost of electronic wheels.  If we are able to get an alternative method of wagering that is more efficient and less expensive, the electronic wheels will be part of the solution and the only table game in Minnesota Lawful Gambling (the most social of games allowed in the charitable gaming taverns) will have a market large enough to justify development costs.

 

 

No Official Committee Hearing Has Been Given Since 2012

Should the legislation pass, Gaming Studio will base the resulting operation in Moorhead, MN.  We anticipate fabrication in Lake Park, MN.

North Dakota

 

Not Active in North Dakota in 2019

 

Border cities in Minnesota could have the advantage of electronic wheel

games with tables that are not found in North Dakota.

Other associated Websites

 

                 www.tri-wheel.com

 

                 www.pigwheel.com

 

                 www.minnesotatri-wheel.blogspot.com

 

                 www.thepigwheel.blogspot.com

Gaming Studio, Inc.  Post Office Box 3112, Fargo, ND  58108

 

      Contact:  joe@gamingstudio.com          701-388-3266

© Copyright 2013, 2019 Gaming Studio, Inc., Fargo, ND, USA.  All rights reserved.